Page tree

Versions Compared

Key

  • This line was added.
  • This line was removed.
  • Formatting was changed.

...

If you are using the Virtual Appliance (VA) that originally came with v4.1.x or later, refer to the Increasing Backup Repository Size on a Virtual Appliance topic.

If you are using the Virtual Appliance (VA) that originally came with v4.0.x or earlier, refer to the information below:

...

Example 3: Adding a separate disk and creating another Backup Repository

  1. Optionally, remove the Onboard Backup Repository from the VA. Do this if the onboard repository is not needed anymore or if you need to reuse the existing disk that the onboard repository resides on for the new backup repository.
  2. Log in to the vSphere Client and add a new hard drive disk to the virtual machine
  3. Rescan the SCSI bus for new hardware by executing the following commands:
    1. cat /proc/partitions and note the list of devices. Note that the Onboard Backup Repository resides on an sdb device.
    2. apt-get install scsitools
    3. rescan-scsi-bus
    4. cat /proc/partitions and see which devices have been added. For example, an sdc device will be found.
  4. Create a partition on the new disk by executing the following commands:
    1. fdisk /dev/<new device>, for example, fdisk /dev/sdc
    2. Command (m for help) – type m to see all options.
    3. Type n to create a new partition.
    4. Type p to create a primary type of partition.
    5. Type 1 to create the first partition.
    6. Press Enter to select the default values for the first and last sectors.
    7. Type t to change the partition’s system id.
    8. Hex code (type L to list codes): Type 8E corresponding to the Linux LVM id.
    9. Type w to write table to disk.
    10. Type the command partprobe to inform the operating system about partition table changes.
    11. Type cat /proc/partitions to verify that the new partition has been created. For example, you have to see sdc1.
  5. Create a new LVM structure on the newly created partition by executing the following commands:
    1. pvcreate /dev/sdb1
    2. pvdisplay to verify that the physical volume has been created.
    3. vgcreate Volume_Group_Name /dev/sdb1
    4. vgdisplay to  verify that the volume group has been created.
    5. lvcreate -l 100%FREE -n Logical_Volume_Name Volume_Group_Name
    6. lvdisplay to verify that the logical volume has been created.
  6. Create a filesystem on the LVM structure:
    mkfs -t ext4 /dev/Volume_Group_Name/Logical_Volume_Name
  7. Create a mount point:
    cd /mnt,
    mkdir repository
  8. Mount your LVM to /etc/fstab file
    1. Edit the file fstab:
      nano /etc/fstab
    2. Add the following line:
      /dev/Volume_Group_Name/Logical_Volume_Name /mount_point ext4 defaults 0 2, where mount_point stands for instance /mnt/repository
    3. Execute mount -a that will make LVM bootable
    4. The df -h -T command shows you the filesystem and mount point of your Backup Repository.
  9. Give proper permissions to the repository mount folder:
    1. chmod -R 770 /mnt/repository
    2. chown -R bhsvc:bhsvc /mnt/repository
  10. Add the backup repository to the NAKIVO Backup & Replication UI using the following path: /mnt/repository

...

Example 5: Removing Onboard repository and replacing with a separate storage larger than 2 TB

  1. Remove the Onboard Backup Repository from the VA.
  2. Log in to the vSphere Client and add a new hard drive disk to the NAKIVO Backup & Replication VA.
  3. Log in to the NAKIVO Backup & Replication VA using root/root credentials.
  4. Rescan the SCSI bus for new hardware by executing the following commands:
    1. cat /proc/partitions and note the list of devices.
    2. apt-get install scsitools
    3. rescan-scsi-bus
    4. cat /proc/partitions and see which devices have been added. For example, you will see an sdb device.
  5. Create a partition on the new disk by executing the following commands:
    1. parted /dev/<new device>, for example, sdb
    2. mklabel gpt (type Yes)
    3. unit TB
    4. mkpart primary 0 100%
      You will see the warning: The resulting partition is not properly aligned for best performance. Ignore/Cancel? You can type Ignore or use sections 1,2 and 3 of this article.
    5. print
    6. quit
    7. type cat /proc/partitions to verify that a new partition has been created. For example, you will see sdb1
  6. Create an LVM structure on the newly created partition by executing the following commands:
    1. pvcreate /dev/sdb1
    2. pvdisplay to verify that pv has been created.
    3. vgcreate Volume_Group_Name /dev/sdb1
    4. vgdisplay to verify that vg has been created.
    5. lvcreate -l 100%FREE -n Logical_Volume_Name Volume_Group_Name
    6. lvdisplay to verify that lv has been created.
  7. Create filesystem on the LVM: mkfs -t ext4 /dev/Volume_Group_Name/Logical_Volume_Name
  8. Mount your LVM to /etc/fstab file
    1. Edit the file fstab: nano /etc/fstab
    2. Add the following line: /dev/Volume_Group_Name/Logical_Volume_Name /mount_point ext4 defaults 0 2
    3. To create a mount point you have to go to mnt  directory (cd /mnt), for example, and create a folder repository: mkdir repository
    4. execute mount -a to make LVM bootable.
    5. execute df -h -T to see the filesystem and mount point of your Backup Repository.
  9. Give proper permissions to the repository folder.
    1. chmod -R 775 /mnt/repository
    2. chown -R bhsvc:bhsvc /mnt/repository

...